Ask The Advisors

Welcome to Hathaway Dinwiddie’s Ask The Diversity Advisors. This site was created to provide a resource for our team members to ask questions and provide access to diversity experts. Questions can be submitted with your name or anonymously. Feel free to submit any diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) questions you may have. As questions are received, questions and responses will be posted on this site. We will never post anyone’s name. An anonymous list of questions and responses will be provided to Hathaway Dinwiddie leaders/managers to assist with identifying DEI training and communications-related needs.
 
This site is intended to provide our team members with access to diversity, inclusion, and equity experts. This site should not be used to ask human resources-related questions i.e., address performance-related issues, benefits, etc. These questions should be directed to [email protected].
 
At Hathaway Dinwiddie, we value the diversity of our team members and look forward to receiving your questions and the diversity experts providing you with responses.
 

Answers

Inclusion happens when people feel like they are an insider and experience a feeling of belonging within their organization.  They are very much themselves and their uniqueness is highly valued.

Thank you for your question regarding unconscious bias.  We all have unconscious bias – our brains take in more information than they can process, so we rely on mental shortcuts to simplify the world around us.  In other words, we rely on stereotypes rather than actual knowledge of an individual circumstance.  Bias is often characterized as stereotypes about people based on the group to which they belong or based on a physical characteristic they possess.  We cannot eliminate biases, but we can be more conscious.  Bias is a disproportionate weight in favor of or against an idea or thing, usually in a way that is closed-minded, prejudicial, or unfair.  Biases can be innate or learned.  People may develop biases for or against an individual, a group, or a belief. Yes, everyone has a bias to one degree or another.  It’s how we counteract them that’s important. 
 
Yes, there are several tests you can complete to understand one’s bias.  Here are two links you can try.  The Diversity Advisors do not endorse these two sites as we have not engaged in discussions with their creators.   We do have a partner organization which provides holistic unconscious bias testing and will discuss this with Hathaway Dinwiddie leadership during future DEI strategy discussions.  
 
 
Something to consider: Consider how your origins may be influencing your interactions with the world.  

Thank you for your question regarding when someone uses the term “color blind” when referring to their position on race.  This could mean different things to different people.  This typically means the person is unable to see the difference between races; that they treat people of different race or skin colors equally.  It could also mean they do not have any racial prejudice or biases.  In our experience, everyone has biases.  Also, most people of color would tend to challenge someone when they say this.  Why? Because people of color are just that people of color with differences in skin color, features and beliefs.  For someone to say they are “color blind” could mean that they are not seeing how beautifully different we all are.  In our experience, when someone says they are “color blind” it usually is a defense mechanism and the person is not acknowledging the differences that make us diverse.  

To answer this question, we need to define what Equality and Equity means. The dictionary defines them as: a. Equality – the state or quality of being; correspondence in quantity, degree, value, rank or ability: b. Equity – the quality of being fair or impartial; fairness; impartiality In the workplace, Equality is when we treat people equally – everyone receives the exact same resources. Equity provides resources specific to the individual to ensure all team members have the same opportunity. Equity takes into account differences and challenges one may have in using the same resources provided. In the workplace, it is important a company recognizes the need to provide everyone with the same resources (Equality) while also providing team members needing it, additional resources (Equity) to allow them the same opportunities as others to use the resources. These three pictures provide examples of the difference between Equity and Equality. Interaction Institute for Social Change and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

We would encourage team members and leaders to steer clear of talking about politics in the workplace. Some team members may feel comfortable discussing this while others may not. Some team members may take offense to such a discussion. Leaders or other team members talking about politics may alienate others from wanting to talk to these same individuals as the team members listening may have different views. Remember, at Hathaway Dinwiddie, we want to be inclusive of everyone – to listen to their thoughts and to allow team members to share. Discussing one’s political view or affiliation does not support our efforts to be an inclusive organization as it alienates team members that may not agree with the various political views. We strongly encourage team members to steer away from discussing their views on politics at work.

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Answers

Inclusion happens when people feel like they are an insider and experience a feeling of belonging within their organization.  They are very much themselves and their uniqueness is highly valued.

Thank you for your question regarding unconscious bias.  We all have unconscious bias – our brains take in more information than they can process, so we rely on mental shortcuts to simplify the world around us.  In other words, we rely on stereotypes rather than actual knowledge of an individual circumstance.  Bias is often characterized as stereotypes about people based on the group to which they belong or based on a physical characteristic they possess.  We cannot eliminate biases, but we can be more conscious.  Bias is a disproportionate weight in favor of or against an idea or thing, usually in a way that is closed-minded, prejudicial, or unfair.  Biases can be innate or learned.  People may develop biases for or against an individual, a group, or a belief. Yes, everyone has a bias to one degree or another.  It’s how we counteract them that’s important. 
 
Yes, there are several tests you can complete to understand one’s bias.  Here are two links you can try.  The Diversity Advisors do not endorse these two sites as we have not engaged in discussions with their creators.   We do have a partner organization which provides holistic unconscious bias testing and will discuss this with Hathaway Dinwiddie leadership during future DEI strategy discussions.  
 
 
Something to consider: Consider how your origins may be influencing your interactions with the world.  

Thank you for your question regarding when someone uses the term “color blind” when referring to their position on race.  This could mean different things to different people.  This typically means the person is unable to see the difference between races; that they treat people of different race or skin colors equally.  It could also mean they do not have any racial prejudice or biases.  In our experience, everyone has biases.  Also, most people of color would tend to challenge someone when they say this.  Why? Because people of color are just that people of color with differences in skin color, features and beliefs.  For someone to say they are “color blind” could mean that they are not seeing how beautifully different we all are.  In our experience, when someone says they are “color blind” it usually is a defense mechanism and the person is not acknowledging the differences that make us diverse.  

To answer this question, we need to define what Equality and Equity means. The dictionary defines them as: a. Equality – the state or quality of being; correspondence in quantity, degree, value, rank or ability: b. Equity – the quality of being fair or impartial; fairness; impartiality In the workplace, Equality is when we treat people equally – everyone receives the exact same resources. Equity provides resources specific to the individual to ensure all team members have the same opportunity. Equity takes into account differences and challenges one may have in using the same resources provided. In the workplace, it is important a company recognizes the need to provide everyone with the same resources (Equality) while also providing team members needing it, additional resources (Equity) to allow them the same opportunities as others to use the resources. These three pictures provide examples of the difference between Equity and Equality. Interaction Institute for Social Change and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

We would encourage team members and leaders to steer clear of talking about politics in the workplace. Some team members may feel comfortable discussing this while others may not. Some team members may take offense to such a discussion. Leaders or other team members talking about politics may alienate others from wanting to talk to these same individuals as the team members listening may have different views. Remember, at Hathaway Dinwiddie, we want to be inclusive of everyone – to listen to their thoughts and to allow team members to share. Discussing one’s political view or affiliation does not support our efforts to be an inclusive organization as it alienates team members that may not agree with the various political views. We strongly encourage team members to steer away from discussing their views on politics at work.